>> Photographer, Brisbane, Australia. <<
>> All photos original, all © T.M. Fletcher 2013-14. <<
>> Tagged mobile photography on the phone, digital on the DSLR. <<

>> Reblogging ok, with all notes and links intact. Please do not use in any other way without my permission. <<

>> Feedback welcome here or email: tower.mill [at] yahoo [dot] com [dot] au <<


Install Theme
Live wires
© T.M. Fletcher

Live wires

© T.M. Fletcher

Fair exchange
© T.M. Fletcher

Fair exchange

© T.M. Fletcher

Signs of age
© T.M. Fletcher

Signs of age

© T.M. Fletcher

The fragility of memory
© T.M. Fletcher
This laneway on Elizabeth Street in the centre of Brisbane is a relic of the city’s past. Today it is a grimy driveway, a refuge for dwindling smokers and occasionally a location for street art. In 1944 it was the laneway beside McLeod’s Bookshop.Doris May Roberts was brutally murdered here on the evening of 19 June 1944. Her badly beaten body was found after 8pm by two young apprentices returning to pick up a bicycle.Within five hours local detectives, assisted by US military police, had located her killer at a military hospital&#8212;one of the tens of thousands of soldiers who passed through Brisbane as war raged in the Pacific. The paratrooper was lying on a bed asleep in his uniform and his boots, which still bore blood stains, and his hand lacerations. He confessed so soon they suspected he may still have been drunk from the long hours of drinking the day before.He was convicted of murder by a court martial and later flown to New Guinea by the US Army, where he was hanged in November that year.The laneway looks like a crime scene, in the popular imagination at least, but the city seems to have forgotten.The accounts of her death record more about Doris May Roberts’ killer than they do about her.

The fragility of memory

© T.M. Fletcher

This laneway on Elizabeth Street in the centre of Brisbane is a relic of the city’s past. Today it is a grimy driveway, a refuge for dwindling smokers and occasionally a location for street art. In 1944 it was the laneway beside McLeod’s Bookshop.
Doris May Roberts was brutally murdered here on the evening of 19 June 1944. Her badly beaten body was found after 8pm by two young apprentices returning to pick up a bicycle.
Within five hours local detectives, assisted by US military police, had located her killer at a military hospital—one of the tens of thousands of soldiers who passed through Brisbane as war raged in the Pacific. The paratrooper was lying on a bed asleep in his uniform and his boots, which still bore blood stains, and his hand lacerations. He confessed so soon they suspected he may still have been drunk from the long hours of drinking the day before.
He was convicted of murder by a court martial and later flown to New Guinea by the US Army, where he was hanged in November that year.
The laneway looks like a crime scene, in the popular imagination at least, but the city seems to have forgotten.
The accounts of her death record more about Doris May Roberts’ killer than they do about her.

The big end
© T.M. Fletcher

The big end

© T.M. Fletcher

Inverted
© T.M. Fletcher

Inverted

© T.M. Fletcher

Next bus
© T.M. Fletcher

Next bus

© T.M. Fletcher

Tuft I
© T.M. Fletcher

Tuft I

© T.M. Fletcher

Furnace
© T.M. Fletcher

Furnace

© T.M. Fletcher

In the mood
© T.M. Fletcher

In the mood

© T.M. Fletcher

Keel hauled
© T.M. Fletcher

Keel hauled

© T.M. Fletcher

Can&#8217;t help but ask yourself
© T.M. Fletcher

Can’t help but ask yourself

© T.M. Fletcher

Oncoming
© T.M. Fletcher

Oncoming

© T.M. Fletcher

Light touch
© T.M. Fletcher

Light touch

© T.M. Fletcher

Non-slip
© T.M. Fletcher

Non-slip

© T.M. Fletcher